Wednesday, January 19, 2011

A Beautifull Makeover!!!

After several things happening at school while I wasn't there... you know all that bullshit drama that happens in high school... well it happens in beauty school as well. I have been down for a few days thinking about everything and have decided that it's all a waste of my time. It's just someone craving excitement in their lives so they want to bring someone down. It's ok though! Life wouldn't be complete without the haters... so I think I will just do Hair, Nails & Makeup to forget about it!


One of my good friends stopped by and basically gave me a sigh of relief. I saw her face and automatically knew that she would be there for me. And that was the greatest feeling ever... after all that hurt. Then, I realized, that her and I have never had conflict, never had any type of miss understandings. So, I thought that she deserves a little makeover!!! She loves when I do her hair and makeup.


Here is before:
The girl on the right is Olivia, and she is the one getting the makeover!!!

So basically, what I did to her hair is curled it, tweezed her eyebrows and applied makeup. Hope you like it!

Here is after:

She is so pretty!!!!

Here is another:

So after I was done, I couldn't believe how amazing she looked!!! I literally think that she could have put a really cute dress and heals on and would have been mistaken for a stunning celebrity on the red carpet!!!

I LOVE DOING MAKEOVERS!!! Especially doing before and after pictures!

I hope everyone likes this!!!


Please leave a comment!!
Thanks for reading!



~Suzzette Drake

6 comments:

  1. Thank you so much for the follow. I really like your blog.
    I follow you too :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks!!!! I appreciate the comment!!!! Thanks for following me!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  3. She's pretty =) .. Great makeover!

    http://www.allthatglitterz1.blogspot.com/

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thanks!!!! I really enjoy doing makeovers!!! :o)

    ReplyDelete
  5. Stem cells are “non-specialized” cells that have the potential to form into other types of specific cells, such as blood, muscles or nerves. They are unlike "differentiated" cells which have already become whatever organ or structure they are in the body. Stem cells are present throughout our body, but more abundant in a fetus.
    Medical researchers and scientists believe that stem cell therapy will, in the near future, advance medicine dramatically and change the course of disease treatment. This is because stem cells have the ability to grow into any kind of cell and, if transplanted into the body, will relocate to the damaged tissue, replacing it. For example, neural cells in the spinal cord, brain, optic nerves, or other parts of the central nervous system that have been injured can be replaced by injected stem cells. Various stem cell therapies are already practiced, a popular one being bone marrow transplants that are used to treat leukemia. In theory and in fact, lifeless cells anywhere in the body, no matter what the cause of the disease or injury, can be replaced with vigorous new cells because of the remarkable plasticity of stem cells. Biomed companies predict that with all of the research activity in stem cell therapy currently being directed toward the technology, a wider range of disease types including cancer, diabetes, spinal cord injury, and even multiple sclerosis will be effectively treated in the future. Recently announced trials are now underway to study both safety and efficacy of autologous stem cell transplantation in MS patients because of promising early results from previous trials.
    History
    Research into stem cells grew out of the findings of two Canadian researchers, Dr’s James Till and Ernest McCulloch at the University of Toronto in 1961. They were the first to publish their experimental results into the existence of stem cells in a scientific journal. Till and McCulloch documented the way in which embryonic stem cells differentiate themselves to become mature cell tissue. Their discovery opened the door for others to develop the first medical use of stem cells in bone marrow transplantation for leukemia. Over the next 50 years their early work has led to our current state of medical practice where modern science believes that new treatments for chronic diseases including MS, diabetes, spinal cord injuries and many more disease conditions are just around the corner. For more information please visit http://www.neurosurgeonindia.org/

    ReplyDelete
  6. Chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI), or the pathological restriction of venous vessel discharge from the CNS has been proposed by Zamboni, et al, as having a correlative relationship to Multiple Sclerosis. From a clinical perspective, it has been demonstrated that the narrowed jugular veins in an MS patient, once widened, do affect the presenting symptoms of MS and the overall health of the patient. It has also been noted that these same veins once treated, restenose after a time in the majority of cases. Why the veins restenose is speculative. One insight, developed through practical observation, suggests that there are gaps in the therapy protocol as it is currently practiced. In general, CCSVI therapy has focused on directly treating the venous system and the stenosed veins. Several other factors that would naturally affect vein recovery have received much less consideration. As to treatment for CCSVI, it should be noted that no meaningful aftercare protocol based on evidence has been considered by the main proponents of the ‘liberation’ therapy (neck venoplasty). In fact, in all of the clinics or hospitals examined for this study, patients weren’t required to stay in the clinical setting any longer than a few hours post-procedure in most cases. Even though it has been observed to be therapeutically useful by some of the main early practitioners of the ‘liberation’ therapy, follow-up, supportive care for recovering patients post-operatively has not seriously been considered to be part of the treatment protocol. To date, follow-up care has primarily centered on when vein re-imaging should be done post-venoplasty. The fact is, by that time, most patients have restenosed (or partially restenosed) and the follow-up Doppler testing is simply detecting restenosis and retrograde flow in veins that are very much deteriorated due to scarring left by the initial procedure. This article discusses a variable approach as to a combination of safe and effective interventional therapies that have been observed to result in enduring venous drainage of the CNS to offset the destructive effects of inflammation and neurodegeneration, and to regenerate disease damaged tissue.
    As stated, it has been observed that a number of presenting symptoms of MS almost completely vanish as soon as the jugulars are widened and the flows equalize in most MS patients. Where a small number of MS patients have received no immediate benefit from the ‘liberation’ procedure, flows in subject samples have been shown not to have equalized post-procedure in these patients and therefore even a very small retrograde blood flow back to the CNS can offset the therapeutic benefits. Furthermore once the obstructed veins are further examined for hemodynamic obstruction and widened at the point of occlusion in those patients to allow full drainage, the presenting symptoms of MS retreat. This noted observation along with the large number of MS patients who have CCSVI establish a clear association of vein disease with MS, although it is clearly not the disease ‘trigger’.For more information please visit http://www.ccsviclinic.ca/?p=978

    ReplyDelete

There was an error in this gadget